Sunday, July 15, 2007

Corel Painter Blues

Corel Painter 9 was the standard program we used for digital storyboarding. It was a great application – super easy to learn, and the tools really mimicked traditional media well. Unlike Photoshop it was designed to paint pictures, so it could do a really good job without too much customization of brushes, or writing of scripts. Unfortunately there were a few problems. Problem #1 It crashed constantly. Problem #2 The default Painter RIFF format would fragment our hard drives like crazy. Problem #3 The RIFF format would frequently get corrupted resulting in the “green screen of death” - a lime green layer that would destroy all of the art in a file. And all attempts to find a work around just made things weirder. To avoid disk fragmentation these Riffs were saved as Photoshop PSD’s. But for whatever reason, every time I’d open them, the images would get turn blue! First time – a little blueish tint. Second time - more blue. Third time – almost totally blue! And after they were uploaded – they turned brown, yellow and purple! Maybe Painter 10 is better…..





















































4 comments:

Dave Pryor said...

Couldn't agree with you more on the weirdness of Painter. I want to love it, but I constantly go back to Photoshop like an old girlfriend because I'm used to it's predictable habits. Thanks for the info on the RIFF files.

Chubbystump said...

I've been working with Painter since Painter 6, I've never come across any of those problems, right now I'm on 9.5 and it runs like a dream, perhaps because I'm using a PC, Photoshop doesn't come close to it..

Jay D Smith said...

great boards!

j.

Dave Thomas said...

Hey Chubbystump,

I'm trying Painter 10 and it seems more stable. We'll see how it goes.

A few months back I switched over to Photoshop, and I think the two programs are pretty close as far as meeting the demands of storyboarding.

I can't post any of the art until the episode airs, but when I can, I'll put the Painter and Photoshop panels side by side, and you'll see what I mean.